Japan Now Back Issues 2002

Japan Now is a newsletter of current topics in Japanese politics, economy, society as well as Japan-related information from around the US. While the publication is currently online, up until 2005, it was a print newsletter. Copies of most back issues between 1999 to 2005 are available in PDF files.

Japan Now

December 2001/January 2002

Table of Contents

  • Ambassador Kato's New Year's Message
  • Taking Expeditious Steps: Japan has moved quickly to lend support to the international war on terror.
  • Joy Greets New Princess.
  • Tokyo Conference Pledges Billions in Afghan Aid.
  • Library of Congress Shows a Treasure Trove of Japanese Art.
  • Trends in Japan: New High-tech Theme Park in Tokyo First of its Kind; Graduates Want Work; Marriage.
  • Eulogizing Ambassador Mansfield
  • Beyond Differences: The Kimono Changed Along with the Nation's Ruling Culture.
  • Ando Honored; Honma's Tribute to 9/11.

Japan Now

Winter 2002

Table of Contents

  • Prime Minister Calls for New Partnership in Asia: Japan's commitment to ASEAN and the region is strongly reconfirmed.
  • 2002, a Year of Revival: The Prime Minister presses his reform agenda; Royal family to visit Europe.
  • Profile of a New Foreign Minister
  • Business News: Public-private plan to boost employment; GE's Welch praises corporate Japan; airline merger; GM back in production.
  • Viewpoint: A translator describes how Japanese fiction is so often misunderstood.
  • Trends in Japan: The most popular phrases in 2001 capture the national spirit; Celebrity homemakers.
  • Beyond Differences: The kimono kept evolving; particularly during the Edo period.
  • World Cup Fever

Japan Now

February 2002

Table of Contents

  • President Bush Praises Prime Minister in Tokyo: President Bush's first official visit to Tokyo.
  • Bilateral Ties Successful: Results of the president's trip are regarded as significant, important.
  • Japan's Role "Extraordinary"
  • Business News: Regional firms eye the export market; pressing the fight against deflation.
  • Science Watch: The power of the ion becomes a big seller; a tea ceremony area in space?
  • Viewpoint: The Freer Gallery holds a unique exhibit of Kenzan ceramic pottery.
  • Trends in Japan: Training tomorrow's business leaders.
  • Beyond Differences: The fascinating story of silk, the world's most celebrated, coveted fabric.
  • Making Mochi: Taking Japanese culture directly into U.S. schools; the world's oldest man.

Japan Now

March 2002

Table of Contents

  • New Foreign Minister's Agenda: In a major speech she promises a strong, caring, straightforward policy.
  • Anti-terror Resolve is Strong: On the six-month anniversary of 9/11, Japan's contributions are mounting.
  • Science Watch: Moving toward a ticketless train station; digital libraries coming alive.
  • Viewpoint: An American scholar on how she became a Haiku master in Japan.
  • Trends in Japan: Volunteerism is on the rise in the changing economy; this time with a new twist.
  • Beyond Differences: The legendary samurai weren't just warriors but became the ruling class.
  • Classical Music as a Bridge: Tokyo philharmonic adviser says music crosses all borders and boundaries.

Japan Now

Spring 2002

Table of Contents

  • Brighter Outlook for 2002: As ambitious reforms have an impact the economy is expected to rebound.
  • Prime Minister on the Budget: He promises a renewed confidence and vitality to meet the nation's expectations.
  • World Cup Excitement Builds: With the games just around the corner preparations continue apace.
  • Viewpoint: Former UNHCR Sadako Ogata speaks on her 10-year effort to help refugees.
  • Beyond Differences: The classic samurai had armor and weapons that were ingenious- and deadly.
  • Important Japan-related Sources: Save this list of key website addresses on Japanese issues.
  • Japanese Dolls on Display: Ningyo have been part of life in Japan since ancient times.

Japan Now

April/May 2002

Table of Contents

  • Prime Minister Sees a New Asian Community: Koizumi's latest region trip firms up relations with more of Japan's neighbors.
  • Foreign Minister Builds Bridges: On a visit to Europe and the Mideast, she covers a wide range of topics.
  • Coalition Support Extended
  • Business Trends: Outscoring catches on; private trips to space; Wal-Mart's new foothold; auto makers are prospering.
  • Viewpoint: A leading Diet member discusses Japan's role in the war against terrorism.
  • "Ethereal Art": Hideo Mori's intriguing method is widely considered to be timeless.
  • Beyond Differences: Competition between the Minamoto and Taira clans in the samurai era.
  • World Cup Snapshots: Hosting the event captures the nation's imagination; schedules and more.

Japan Now

Summer 2002

Table of Contents

  • G-8 has Broad Agenda: Developments at the G-8 Summit.
  • Japan seen as a dependable ally: The latest polls of U.S. attitudes toward Japan show positive views at record heights.
  • Science Watch: Chasing the elusive international dream of clean fusion energy; new developments
  • Business Trends: The numbers show an economy turning the corner after a decade in the doldrums; Info-Net project will go ahead.
  • Viewpoint: A top economist assesses the realistic challenges, prospects, for true reforms.
  • The old and the new: The landmine threat is an example of Japan’s rapid adaptation to new perils.
  • Beyond Differences: Samurai beat of Kublai Kahn, twice.
  • Trends in Japan: The wonderful art of Kyogen; Asia’s first World Cup finals will be hard to beat.

Japan Now

Fall 2002

Table of Contents

  • Prime Minister’s Remarks: He speaks out about terrorism, world prosperity, Asia and the ties that bind.
  • Concrete Actions Against Terror
  • Foreign Minister Sees Challenges:Kawaguchi says personal experiences in the U.S. shape her vision of the relationship.
  • Viewpoint:"Pacific Overtures" is a timeless musical production which author Miyamoto hopes will have audiences thinking carefully about change in both nations.
  • Educational Reforms: Japan has adopted a less-constricting school curriculum to better prepare students for global competition.
  • Beyond Differences: The Ashikaga family ruled for 200 years and provided Japan with 15 shoguns.
  • Sports Explosion; Spirited Away: A whole new group of competitive sports are catching on; swimming lessons anyone? The first animated film under Disney’s banner.